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Selected Date: 3/30/2015
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Family Code 262.302 on 3/30/2015

	
					

Sec. 262.302.  ACCEPTING POSSESSION OF CERTAIN ABANDONED CHILDREN. (a) A designated emergency infant care provider shall, without a court order, take possession of a child who appears to be 60 days old or younger if the child is voluntarily delivered to the provider by the child's parent and the parent did not express an intent to return for the child.

(b)  A designated emergency infant care provider who takes possession of a child under this section has no legal duty to detain or pursue the parent and may not do so unless the child appears to have been abused or neglected. The designated emergency infant care provider has no legal duty to ascertain the parent's identity and the parent may remain anonymous. However, the parent may be given a form for voluntary disclosure of the child's medical facts and history.

(c)  A designated emergency infant care provider who takes possession of a child under this section shall perform any act necessary to protect the physical health or safety of the child. The designated emergency infant care provider is not liable for damages related to the provider's taking possession of, examining, or treating the child, except for damages related to the provider's negligence.

Amended by Acts 2001, 77th Leg., ch. 809, Sec. 4, eff. Sept. 1, 2001.

The statutes available on this website are current through the 87th 2nd Called Legislative Session, 2021. The Texas Constitution is current through the amendments approved by voters in November 2019. In 2018 the section headings to the constitution, which are not officially part of the text of the constitution, were revised to reflect amendments and to modernize the language.